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Sexually Violent Predators Civil Commitment Section

The Sexually Violent Predators Civil Commitment Section in the Criminal Justice and Public Safety Division represents the Commonwealth in all matters arising out of the Civil Commitment of Sexually Violent Predators Act, (“SVP Act”), Virginia Code § 37.2-900 et seq. The SVP Act allows the Office to petition a circuit court for the civil commitment of certain sexual offenders who have a mental abnormality or personality disorder and because of that mental health condition are likely to commit future sexually violent offenses.

The SVP Act applies to 1) prisoners in the Department of Corrections who are incarcerated for sexually violent offenses who are nearing their release date and 2) defendants who have been charged with sexually violent offenses and found unrestorably incompetent to stand trial by a court. The offenders are initially screened by the Department of Corrections. Based on certain statutory criteria, those offenders who are likely to reoffend are referred for a psychological evaluation and more intensive screening and review by an interagency committee. After that screening and review, the committee refers the cases to the Office of the Attorney General with certain recommendations.

Once the Office reviews the case, a petition for civil commitment may be filed with one of the circuit courts of the Commonwealth. After a trial on the petition, if an offender is found to be a sexually violent predator, then the circuit court decides whether to civilly commit the offender or conditionally release him to the community.

Offenders who are civilly committed are placed in a secure, intensive, inpatient sex offender treatment program at a facility run by the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (“DBHDS”). If civilly committed, the offender is entitled to an annual review hearing every year for the first five years, and every two years thereafter. At each hearing, the court must decide whether the offender remains a sexually violent predator and if so, whether he remains in need of secure inpatient treatment.

If the offender is conditionally released, he is monitored in accordance with a conditional release plan developed by DBHDS and approved by the court. He is placed on a GPS monitor, and is supervised by a probation and parole officer who reports on his behavior and compliance at least every 6 months. If an offender on conditional release violates the terms and conditions of his release, he may be taken into custody, have his conditional release revoked, and ultimately be civilly committed to an inpatient facility of DBHDS.

 

Jill M. Ryan

Senior Assistant Attorney General/Chief

Sexually Violent Predators Civil Commitment Section

Office of the Attorney General
202 North Ninth Street
Richmond, VA 23219

 

 

 

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Computer Crime Section

The mission of the Computer Crime Section is to spearhead child exploitation prosecutions, computer crime prosecutions and identity theft prosecutions across Virginia; work closely with federal, state, and local authorities to investigate and apprehend child exploitation and computer crime offenders; forensically analyze computer evidence seized during investigations; educate the public on the dangers of the Internet through speaking engagements and the development of educational programs; and work to further strengthen and improve Virginia’s child exploitation and computer crime laws. For more information on the Computer Crime Section, including helpful resources, please visit its webpage and Facebook page.

 

Samuel E. Fishel

Senior Assistant Attorney General/Chief

Computer Crime Section

Office of the Attorney General
202 North Ninth Street
Richmond, VA 23219

 

 

 

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Major Crimes & Emerging Threats Section

The Major Crimes and Emerging Threats Section is the primary prosecutorial arm of the Office of the Attorney General. The Section has attorneys stationed in Richmond, Fairfax, Norfolk, Harrisonburg and Abingdon. Attorneys in the Section conduct criminal investigations, prosecutions and litigation, representing the Commonwealth and victims in both state and federal courts, in cases involving homicides, gangs, narcotics trafficking, identity theft and other major crimes.

They also participate in state Multi-Jurisdictional Grand Juries and state and federal task forces. In addition, its attorneys provide a range of legal services to state agency clients, including The Department of State Police, the Department of Forensic Science, the Department of Criminal Justice Services, the Office of the State Inspector General and other agencies on legal issues ranging from contract and policy review to day to day agency advice matters and handling administrative proceedings to litigation.

The Section also has three investigators that conduct investigations of financial and financial related crimes under the Virginia criminal code, including complex financial crimes cases such as money laundering, bank fraud, embezzlement, identity theft and other related crimes. These investigations are coordinated with local, state, and federal law enforcement and government agencies and task forces. In addition, they prepare evidence for prosecution and testify to such findings in state and federal courts as needed.

 

Michael A. Jagels

Senior Assistant Attorney General/Chief

Major Crimes & Emerging Threats Section

Office of the Attorney General
202 North Ninth Street
Richmond, VA 23219
 

 

 

 

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Health Care Fraud & Elder Abuse Section

The MFCU employs a professional staff of criminal investigators, auditors, attorneys and support staff who work together to develop investigations and prosecute cases. The Virginia MFCU works regularly with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies to combat fraud, protect our most vulnerable citizens and to save taxpayer dollars. Since 1982, the MFCU has recovered more than $800 million in criminal and civil recoveries including affirmative civil enforcement cases (ordered and collected reimbursements, fines and restitutions). In 2008, the Virginia MFCU was named the number one MFCU in the country by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General. The MFCU is proud to serve among the nation's leaders in combating fraud in the Medicaid program.

The Unit is charged with the investigation and prosecution of Medicaid providers who conduct their businesses in a fraudulent manner. The intended result of this effort is to deter all providers of medical services from engaging in fraudulent or abusive behavior.
In order to achieve this goal, the Unit will:

  • Conduct professional and timely criminal investigations that lead to just results.

  • Collaborate with other state and federal agencies involved in the battle against healthcare fraud and patient abuse and neglect. In fact, the MFCU is uniquely positioned to take the lead in investigating and prosecuting healthcare fraud and patient abuse and neglect in the Commonwealth

  • Seek alternatives to criminal prosecution, when appropriate, to reinforce and instill in the provider community a desire to comply with all regulations promulgated by the Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS)

  • Refine internal operating procedures designed to produce timely investigative results and maximize Unit resources in order to promote efficient and thorough strategies for each case

  • Promote effective communication between the Unit and DMAS, thereby increasing the number and quality of referrals

  • Maintain the highest standards of excellence through aggressive training on current fraud trends and law enforcement tools in an attempt to better combat fraud in the Medicaid program

  • Provide assistance related to nationwide civil and criminal healthcare fraud matters.

 

Randall L. Clouse

Director and Chief

Health Care Fraud & Elder Abuse Section

Office of the Attorney General
202 North Ninth Street
Richmond, VA 23219